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    Posts Tagged ‘molecular imaging’

    Microbubble Imaging for Cancer Early Detection: Don Listwin Talks the Latest Technology

    January 16, 2013

    During our annual Ladies’ Luncheon “You’ve Got a Date with the Valley Girl” on February 8th, Jesse Draper, Don Listwin and Sam Gambhir will focus their conversation on microbubble imaging technology. Sound complicated? Watch this short video where Don explains microbubble technology and how it could radically change the way we detect cancer and stop it at the earliest possible stage. We hope you’ll be able to join us!

    You’ve Got a Date with the Valley Girl: Let’s Talk Cancer Early Detection

    January 15, 2013

    Screen shot 2013-01-15 at 9.25.23 PMEvery year, Canary Foundation hosts a Ladies’ Luncheon, where we discuss our most cutting edge research on cancer early detection, and discuss its implementation. This year, our luncheon “You’ve Got a Date with the Valley Girl,” will be on February 8th, and will be hosted by Jesse Draper, creator and host of “The Valley Girl Show” where she interviews start up executives and innovators. She runs the technology blog Lalawag.com and is a regular featured writer for the Mashable, San Francisco Chronicle, Huffington Post and Glam.

    Save the date and plan to sit in as Jesse interviews Sanjiv (Sam) Gambhir, MD, PhD, Chair of Radiology at Stanford University, Director of the Canary Center at Stanford and Don Listwin, Founder and Chairman of the Canary Foundation.

    Check out the video below to see Don invite you to join us for this fabulous annual luncheon!

    What Will Cancer Early Detection Look Like?

    September 18, 2012

    Co- authored by Abbie Lieberman.

    Imagine the year is 2030. Jane Doe has been feeling under the weather and is experiencing unfamiliar stomach pain. Her doctor sends her a portable, at-home screening kit that can test for multiple conditions including a variety of cancers. She takes a picture of the results using her smart device and sends them off to her doctor. A day later in the clinic, her doctor informs her that she has the earliest stages of ovarian cancer detectable. In this future time, Jane’s cancer cells are removed quickly and she is out of danger. In such a world, cancer is found early and is eliminated or reduced to a chronic illness, rarely being a fatal disease. Jane is closely monitored from this time forward and she goes on to live a long and happy life.

    When cancer early detection tools become a reality, cancer screenings will change drastically and so will the impact of this disease on human life. Cancer could be re-categorized to become a condition or a disease swiftly dealt with, with fewer side effects or damage to the body. However, at-home tests to detect cancer early could be a long way off in the future. Is there something we can believe in without waiting for the Jane Doe scenario to come about?

    In the more near-term, Canary researchers foresee important steps becoming practiced in our lifetime. A patient will most likely go into a doctor’s office, and get an extensive panel of blood work done at an annual exam. If the results are positive, an imaging test will be conducted to determine exactly where the cancer cells are. We already know this truth: when found early, a tumor can be removed or treated before it spreads. The patient’s survival rate increases to 90% (generalized) compared to the 10% survival rate when found late (today’s norm). More »

    Canary Innovation: Measurable Progress, Real Results

    June 4, 2012

    Here at Canary Foundation, one of our highest priorities is building a culture of innovation, which we leverage to produce results, save time and lower costs. Both our scientific programs and administrative initiatives reflect these disciplines. We’re proud to report that this approach is helping Canary demonstrate real results in the work we do:

    • Canary Foundation developed the first test for a new lung cancer biomarker identified by the team. While tests exist for other biomarkers, there were none for this one, so the team created a test that is now available for any research institution to utilize.
    • Our prostate cancer clinical trial called PASS (Prostate Active Surveillance Study) is the only multisite clinical trial for men on active surveillance.  This way of organizing a trial is now being recognized as the most viable way of conducting trials to monitor men with localized, low-risk prostate cancer.
    • Canary Foundation’s Tissue Microarray (TMA) project has also led the way in scientific research. Digitized tissue images and a standardized way to conduct digital analyses were the innovations that provide researchers with an online way of sharing and analyzing data that is not the norm in scientific research.
    • The Canary Center at Stanford for cancer early detection is the first in the world studying the two-test process of identifying cancer through a blood test and pinpointing the location of the tumor through molecular imaging. More »

    Joining the Fight Against Breast Cancer

    February 8, 2012

    Currently, a woman living in the U.S. has a 12.1% risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer — that’s 1 out of 8 women. Think about 8 women you know; mothers, sisters, friends, coworkers – that’s how close this disease is to each of us. It’s a disease that requires our attention, resources, and brightest minds to work collaboratively to beat it. Today, we announce another bold step in our mission: the launch of the Canary Breast Cancer Program.

    We’re funding two forward-thinking research projects that will lay the foundation for a new Breast Cancer Early Detection Initiative. One study will focus on finding biomarkers in the blood of women diagnosed with breast cancer that may indicate the presence of tumor growth. The second study will develop an imaging modality to detect breast cancer at the earliest stages. As such, it offers great potential in detecting very small tumors– pinpointing the location for surgery or target therapies before the cancer has the chance to spread.

    Building upon the successful models of our other research programs, we have a tremendous opportunity to develop early detection tools that will help save the lives of women all over the world.

    Our work wouldn’t be possible without the support of our community. We invite you to take action, show your support by making a donation to the Breast Cancer Early Detection Initiative.

     Sharon Pitteri, PhD, Assistant Professor of Research at the Canary Center at Stanford, will be leading this bold initiative forward. In this video, she shares her inspiration for working in the field of early detection as well as a brief overview of the program structure and goals. 

    Discovering Biomarkers for Early Cancer Detection (Whiteboard Video)

    February 5, 2012

    Canary Foundation is working toward simple blood tests and molecular imaging techniques that detect cancer at an early stage when it is most treatable and when a cure is most likely. These tests rely on biomarkers, specific indicators that cancer cells are found among the body’s healthy tissues. Proteins produced by a developing tumor are one type of biomarker. A cancer cell, compared to a healthy one, may make a new type of protein or different amounts of normal proteins. An early detection blood test would detect the abnormal protein as soon as it appeared in the body. Canary Center at Stanford’s faculty researcher Dr. Parag Mallick describes the challenge of discovering these biomarkers and using them for early cancer detection.

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